Maryland’s coronavirus tallies grow by 631 cases, 5 deaths; state surpasses 15,000 hospitalizations since start of pandemic

Maryland officials reported 631 new cases of coronavirus and five new deaths associated with COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, on Thursday. Those additions bring the state to 118,519 confirmed infections and 3,717 fatalities during the pandemic’s six months. Through Tuesday’s data, Maryland has the 22nd-most cases per capita and 12th-most deaths per capita among states, according to the Johns Hopkins University’s coronavirus resource center. (Balt Sun)

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Maryland starts preparing for a COVID-19 vaccine

Maryland health officials are already planning how to deploy a COVID-19 vaccine whenever one becomes available. On Wednesday, the same day federal officials announced ambitious plans to distribute a vaccine within 24 hours of its authorization, Maryland Department of Health leaders briefed state lawmakers on their plans. Medically vulnerable people and health care workers will likely be among the first to receive the vaccine, said Dr. Jinlene Chan, Maryland's acting deputy health secretary. But the supply of the vaccine will be limited at first. (Balt Sun)

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Feds tie Baltimore’s ‘N.F.L.’ group to contract killing of rapper Nick Breed, drug supply that killed member’s own father

His rap songs preached non-violence, but in late 2018 members of Edmondson Village’s “N.F.L.” organization believed Dominic Gantt, known as “Nick Breed,” was planning to avenge one of their murders. Federal prosecutors say N.F.L. placed a bounty on Gantt. When he was gunned down on Oct. 21, 2018, another member of the organization said in a wiretapped phone call the deed was done: “We got the rapper outta there.” (Balt Sun)

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Annapolis housing authority board approves $900,000 federal discrimination lawsuit settlement

The Annapolis housing authority Board of Commissioners unanimously approved a $900,000 settlement in a federal discrimination lawsuit on Thursday, according to a copy of the agreement obtained by The Capital. The agreement mirrors in many ways a consent decree the Annapolis City Council agreed to last week, including the monetary settlement of $900,000 that will be paid to the 15 families who are plaintiffs in the case. The sum includes the plaintiffs' attorneys' fees and costs. (Cap Gazette)

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Maryland reports 643 new coronavirus cases, 6 more deaths

Nine days after Labor Day, coronavirus cases remain high in Maryland’s Eastern Shore counties, which had been targeted as potential virus hotspots. Case loads per capita in Caroline, Dorchester, Worcester and Wicomico counties remain among the highest in the state. On Wednesday, Maryland announced 643 new coronavirus cases and six deaths linked to COVID-19, the disease the virus causes. (Balt Sun)

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Maryland's top health official warns second Covid-19 surge could be 'even more serious'

Maryland health officials are worried about a second wave of Covid-19 this fall and warned state lawmakers Wednesday that even if a vaccine becomes available, it will be slow to distribute and not widely available to the public. Health Secretary Robert Neall laid out the Department of Health's priorities for the next 8-12 weeks during a briefing with the General Assembly's Joint Covid-19 Response Legislative Workgroup. He said the department is working to ensure hospitals have enough capacity to handle what could be a large influx of patients if Covid-19 cases spike again as flu season begins. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Md. launches program aimed at reducing COVID-19 in Hispanic communities

The Maryland Health Department has convened an inter-agency task force aimed at reducing the COVID-19 positivity rate in Hispanic communities, Dr. Jinlene Chan, deputy secretary of public health services, told lawmakers Tuesday. The Hispanic Outreach Task Force, spearheaded by the Department of Health, the Maryland Emergency Management Agency and the Department of Human Services in partnership with local organizations, is looking to provide support to Baltimore City to connect underserved Hispanic communities to social services, prevention tactics, isolation housing, educational materials and contact tracing. (Balt Sun)

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A Texas cardiologist said his daughter was attacked by ‘BLM’ in Baltimore. Twitter exploded, but video tells a different story.

On Sunday afternoon, a Texas cardiologist wrote on Twitter that his daughter in Baltimore had been attacked by “BLM" or Black Lives Matter activists, and that city police refused to do anything because the suspects were Black. “Is this the America we want?” he tweeted. Nearly 50,000 people uncritically retweeted or liked the post. But two different Twitter accounts with a close ear to the police scanner found what appeared to be the incident in question: It didn’t involve activists, but rather squeegee kids. (Balt Sun)

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